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C语言代写 | OS | CSI3131 – Operating Systems Lab1

C语言代写 | OS | CSI3131 – Operating Systems Lab1

CSI3131 – Operating Systems
Objectives:
Lab1
Experiment with spawning processes using fork. Examining the process status as it progresses.
Lab Setup
You will need a Unix/Linus OS shell with gcc/g++ c-compiler.
 If you’re using MAC you’re probably already setup for this Lab, as MAC OS
is a UNIX based OS.
 If you’re using Windows OS, you have many options:
1. Windows 10 provides aSubsystem for linux, here is a link from Microsoft on how to set it up for windows 10:https://docs.microsoft.com/en-us/windows/wsl/install-win10
2. Install Cygwin. Go tohttp://preshing.com/20141108/how-to-install- thelatest-gcc-on-windows/and follow the instructions to install Cygwin
3. Use Linux server provided in the lab
Part1
Systemverilog is hardware description language that is extensively used in ASIC/FPGA design and verification. The language supports the following three forms of the fork constructs for threads:
In the above three fork scenarios, the process spawns 3 different threads of processing preforming tasks in addition to the original thread that is also performing its own task.
Depending on the join construct used the behavior of the threads may differ as follows:
 The join construct makes the parent wait for all child threads to finish before resuming the parent process.
 The join_none construct makes the parent not to wait for any child threads to finish before resuming the parent process, i.e. it runs concurrently with the child threads.
fork
task1;
task2;
task3;
join
fork
task1;
task2;
task3;
join_none
fork
task1;
task2;
task3;
join_any

 The join_any construct makes the parent wait for at least one child process to finish before resuming the parent process.
Your task is to mimic the above behavior for processes rather than threads. Assuming you have 3 applications in the path named task1, task2, and task3.
The solution of the first mode is provided together with a task application. The attached Lab1.zip file includes a directory part1 that contains 2 files:
1. task.c is a simple console application that sleeps for n seconds, marking the start/end of the process. The time period (n) is passed to the task as a command line argument
2. fork_join.c is the solution of the fork-join scenario as explained above. The fork_join application takes up to 4 arguments as command line arguments, namely task1, task2, task3, and parent task time periods, respectively. Checkout how the task is launched inside the child process. https://linux.die.net/man/3/execlp
3. Copy the fork_join.c file to fork_join_none.c and make the necessary modifications to make it behave as a fork-join-none case.
4. Copy the fork_join.c file to fork_join_any.c and make the necessary modifications to make it behave as a fork-join-any case.
NOTE: Keep the logging messages intact as it will be used to automatically mark your assignment. Failure to do so will result in automatic deductions!
Also attached is the expected results for few of the test cases that will be used in marking, other cases will also be used to verify the correctness of your code.
5. Your submission should include only the 4 c-files named above. Don’t include executables not log files.
Part2
Linux presents information on processes via the file system. Statistics on running processes can be examined by opening regular files. Note that these files do not exist on the hard drive, but in main memory. In fact they are not files at all, but simply system data presented as files.
The directory /proc contains a set of directories and files that provides access to general OS information about each process running on the system. Each process has a unique identifier, called the PID (Process Identifier). In /proc, the PID is presented as a directory. The contents of the PID directory provides information on the corresponding process. You can obtain documentation on the proc directory using “man proc” command.
In this part of the lab, you shall examine how a process executes and changes Some utilities (shell programs) and C programs have been provided to examine the changes in processes (by reading the contents of the /proc directory) as they execute different programs.

You will gain insight into the state of a process and the difference between running in the two modes of execution (kernel and user).
Enter command: ls /proc. The content of the /proc directory will be listed. You will see many number entries (representing directories containing information about processes, for example directory 23406 contains information about process with PID 23406), as well as some more meaningful entries (for example ‘version’ and ‘cpuinfo’).
Enter command cat /proc/version | more. This should display the content of the file ’/proc/version’ that contains information about the OS version.
Enter command cat /proc/cpuinfo | more. You might want to explore the content of other files as well.
Enter command ps. This will list the processes you have launched. At least two processes will be listed: ‘ps’ (the one you just launched and which is producing this and a shell process (probably ‘bash’, but could be different, depending on your settings). Write down the PID of the shell process.
Enter command cat /proc/NNN/stat | more, where NNN is the PID of your shell process from the previous step. You will see a bunch of numbers containing lots of information about this process. You can learn the meaning of the numbers by entering man proc | more command, which would show you the manual for proc. You can see most of this information in human readable form in the file ‘/proc/NNN/status’. Try cat /proc/NNN/status
1. Compile and run calcloop.c (g++ calcloop.c –o calcloop.exe)
2. Compile and run cploop.c
3. Compile procmon.c and preview its code – no need to modify this file
4. Run calcloop.exe in the background and run procmon.exe passing it
calcloop’s PID – checkout the process progress, it should look somewhat like the following:
$ ./calcloop & [1] 6740
$ ./procmon 6740
Monitoring /proc/6740/stat:
Time State
0 Sleeping(memory)
1 Running
2 Sleeping(memory)
3 Sleeping(memory)
4 Sleeping(memory)
5 Running
SysTm UsrTm
0 4062
0 4906
0 5078
0 5078
0 5078
0 5937

6 Sleeping(memory)
7 Sleeping(memory)
8 Sleeping(memory)
9 Running
10 Sleeping(memory)
11 Sleeping(memory)
12 Sleeping(memory)
13 Running
14 Sleeping(memory)
15 Sleeping(memory)
16 Sleeping(memory)
17 Running
18 Sleeping(memory)
19 Sleeping(memory)
20 Sleeping(memory)
0 6062
0 6062
0 6062
0 6953
0 7015
0 7015
0 7015
0 7984
0 8062
0 8062
0 8062
0 9000
0 9031
0 9031
0 9031
procmon: Cannot open /proc/6740/stat, the monitored process is not running any more.
[1]+ Done ./calcloop
Notice how the user-time is incremented every time the process is running and remains constant every time the process is sleeping (idle)
5. Run cploop.exe in the background and run procmon.exe passing it cploop’s PID – checkout the process progress, it should look somewhat like the following:
$ ./cploop.exe & [1] 6884
$ ./procmon 6884
Monitoring /proc/6884/stat:
Time State SysTm UsrTm 0 Running 1859 265 1 Sleeping(memory) 2093 343 2 Sleeping(memory) 2093 343 3 Sleeping(memory) 2093 343 4 Running 2656 484 5 Sleeping(memory) 2687 484 6 Sleeping(memory) 2687 484 7 Sleeping(memory) 2687 484 8 Sleeping(memory) 3312 625 9 Sleeping(memory) 3312 625
10 Sleeping(memory) 3312 625
11 Running 3515 656
12 Sleeping(memory) 3921 734
13 Sleeping(memory) 3921 734
14 Sleeping(memory) 3921 734
15 Running 4390 812
16 Sleeping(memory) 4546 843
17 Sleeping(memory) 4546 843
18 Sleeping(memory) 4546 843
19 Sleeping(memory) 5203 921
20 Sleeping(memory) 5203 921
21 Sleeping(memory) 5203 921
22 Running 5312 937
23 Sleeping(memory) 5890 1156
24 Sleeping(memory) 5890 1156
25 Sleeping(memory) 5890 1156
26 Running 6078 1203
27 Sleeping(memory) 6515 1281
28 Sleeping(memory) 6515 1281
29 Sleeping(memory) 6515 1281
30 Running 6968 1328
procmon: Cannot open /proc/6884/stat, the monitored process is not running any more.
[1]+ Done ./cploop.exe
Notice how both system and user times are incremented every time the process is running. Reflect on why this is the case.

6. Your task is to complete the code of mon.c, which is programmatically performing steps 1-5. Follow the instructions commented in the code:
/* Here comes your code.*/ /* It should do the following:
1. fork/launch the program ‘calcloop’ and get its pid
2. fork/launch ‘procmon pid’ where pid is the pid of the process launched in step 1
3. wait till calcloop process ends
4. wait till procmon process ends
5. fork/launch the program ‘cploop’ and get its pid
6. fork/launch ‘procmon pid’ where pid is the pid of the process
launched in step 5
7. wait till cploop process ends
8. wait till procmon process ends */
7. Include only the source code for the files in part2 directory
8. Zip part1 & part2 directory in one zip file lab1.zip and submit on bright
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